HSC Chemistry 1st Paper Note 3rd Chapter Periodic Properties of Elements & Chemical Bonding

HSC Chemistry 1st Paper Note 3rd Chapter Periodic Properties of Elements & Chemical Bonding. The elements in the periodic table are arranged in order of increasing atomic number. All of these elements display several other trends and we can use the periodic law and table formation to predict their chemical, physical, and atomic properties. Understanding these trends is done by analyzing the elements electron configuration; all elements prefer an octet formation and will gain or lose electrons to form that stable configuration.

We can never determine the atomic radius of an atom because there is never a zero probability of finding an electron and thus never a distinct boundary to the atom. All that we can measure is the distance between two nuclei (internuclear distance). A covalent radius is one-half the distance between the nuclei of two identical atoms. Anionic radius is one-half the distance between the nuclei of two ions in an ionic bond. The distance must be apportioned between the smaller cation and larger anion. A metallic radius is one-half the distance between the nuclei of two adjacent atoms in a crystalline structure. The noble gases are left out of the trends in atomic radii because there is great debate over the experimental values of their atomic radii. The SI units for measuring atomic radii are the nanometer (nm) and the picometer (pm). 1 nm = 1 X 10-9 m; 1 pm = 1 X 10-12 m.

HSC Chemistry 1st Paper Note 3rd Chapter Periodic Properties of Elements & Chemical Bonding

HSC Chemistry 1st Paper Note 3rd Chapter Periodic Properties of Elements & Chemical Bonding

HSC Chemistry 1st Paper Note 3rd Chapter Periodic Properties of Elements & Chemical Bonding

HSC Chemistry 1st Paper Note 3rd Chapter Periodic Properties of Elements & Chemical Bonding

HSC Chemistry 1st Paper Note 3rd Chapter Periodic Properties of Elements & Chemical Bonding

A chemical bond is a lasting attraction between atoms, ions or molecules that enables the formation of chemical compounds. The bond may result from the electrostatic force of attraction between oppositely charged ions as in ionic bonds, or through the sharing of electrons as in covalent bonds. The strength of chemical bonds varies considerably; there are “strong bonds” or “primary bond” such as metallic, covalent or ionic bonds and “weak bonds” or “secondary bond” such as dipole-dipole interactions, the London dispersion force, and hydrogen bonding.

Since opposite charges attract via a simple electromagnetic force, the negatively charged electrons that are orbiting the nucleus and the positively charged protons in the nucleus attract each other. An electron positioned between two nuclei will be attracted to both of them, and the nuclei will be attracted toward electrons in this position. This attraction constitutes the chemical bond. Due to the matter wave nature of electrons and their smaller mass, they must occupy a much larger amount of volume compared with the nuclei, and this volume occupied by the electrons keeps the atomic nuclei in a bond relatively far apart, as compared with the size of the nuclei themselves.

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HSC Chemistry 1st Paper Note 3rd Chapter Periodic Properties of Elements & Chemical Bonding

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